Quirky Stone Homes and Cottages Along the Water’s Edge


Consider it the best of both words: an old stone home with a sensational water view. Yes, waterfront stone homes do exist. To find them, we hiked up to the Great Lakes region, where, believe it or not, stone homes dot the shorelines.

Take a peek at our four favorites, currently on the market. Caveat: They’re not all in top-top shape, but we think that with the right upgrades and TLC, they could serve as cozy family vacation homes for generations to come.

Wisconsin Boathouse with Beautiful Views


Nestled on a wooded lot and surrounded by Wisconsin’s Nicolet National Forest, this old wood- and stone-clad boathouse would prove the ideal retreat for a writer or artist in need of solitude and inspiration. This adorable cottage overlooks Pine Lake, located at the headwaters of Wolf River, and boasts its own dock and close proximity to sandy shores.

Crystal Lake Cottage to Call Home


The interior of this old cobblestone home would require a complete gut-renovation, but the rewards might just be worth the effort. The property sits along Crystal Lake, a 730-acre body of water located in Michigan’s Montcalm County. The lake is spring-fed and ideal for sailing, fishing and watersports. No shared access means complete privacy no matter what the season.

Fieldstone Home with Hella-Good Views


Another Crystal Lake gem, this lovely circa-1874 home boasts 18-inch-thick fieldstone walls and extensive renovations throughout. A new master bedroom even opens out to a private brick patio! Located in the village of Beulah, this home sits on 10 acres of property that includes 150 feet of lake frontage.

Island Getaway in Ohio


Last but not least on our list of faves is this circa-1870s stone home, located in the “Key West of Lake Erie,” otherwise known as South Bass Island. The home is a stone’s throw from the shore and boasts a circa-1850s all-stone wine press cottage, a pole barn, a garage and a tool shed. Both the main home and cottage are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the property previously served as a tourist attraction that celebrated Lake Erie’s winemaking history.

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